Kent Feurring, Sagaponack pilot, perishes in plane crash at EH


John Musnicki

Kent L. Feurring, 57, of Sagaponack, who was also president of the East Hampton Aviation Association, was killed around 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, when his small motor plane, a Seamax M-22, flew collapsed in a corner of Three-Mile-Harbour.

The Seamax M-22 is a Brazilian single-engine amphibious light sport aircraft and Fédération Aéronautique Internationale microlight aircraft. Originally manufactured by AirMax Construções Aeronáuticas of Jacarepaguá and called Airmax SeaMax, it has been built since 2015 by Seamax Aircraft of Sao Paulo.

Eyewitnesses observed the separation of a wing that preceded the plane’s sudden and violent descent from the huge blue sky into the shallow waters just off (Jeff Briggs) East Hampton Marina 19 Boatyard Drive in East Hampton . The plane reportedly just left East Hampton Town Airport at 12:19 p.m., just eleven minutes earlier.

Mr Feurring described himself on Facebook as ‘A single dad, filmmaker and pilot,… who lives in Sagaponack but is from Miami.’ His schooling included Miami County Day School, Harvard University, University of Miami, and University of Miami.

His plane exploded on impact according to eyewitnesses. Within minutes, an East Hampton police officer responding to a 9-1-1 call was on the scene. A perimeter zone was then established until the coroner could inspect the body. Later, East Hampton police located a wing of the plane using a drone. It hung from a nearby tree not far from a longtime osprey nest in the small cove.

As the sun set Thursday, October 6, the wreckage of the plane was being unloaded from three small vessels by the East Hampton Marine Patrol for examination by the FAA, National Transportation Board and Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s Office. . Small aircraft accidents by the separation of a single wing are very rare. On most small aircraft, the spars run through the wings, connecting into a “wing box” at the bottom of the fuselage, ensuring the wings cannot come apart. Rainer Groh, the author of the Aerospace Engineering Blog, is quoted as saying, “The only possible way for an airplane wing to come off (in good weather) would be poor maintenance.”

An example of the many sympathetic posts on Mr Feurring’s Facebook page is exemplified by the post of Scarlet Magda who posted: ‘It’s heartbreaking to lose one of the good ones. Kent Feuring was a passionate and meticulous pilot, a steward of our community and helped navigate many difficult situations at our local airport. All I can say is that at least he died doing what he loved the most, and you never know when that’s gonna end, so practice gratitude and live each day like it’s was the last. Rest in peace Kent. I appreciate you sharing your beloved world of aviation with me.

As the sun set Thursday, October 6, the wreckage of the plane was being unloaded from three small vessels by the East Hampton Marine Patrol for examination by the FAA, National Transportation Board and Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s Office. .

It should be noted that as president of the East Hampton Aviation Association, Kent Feurring participated in the official conversation regarding the fate of East Hampton Town Airport, including a moderation panel that was convened to discuss. This panel was moderated (with a “fair balance” for all) by Joseph Shaw, Editor-in-Chief at Express Newspaper Group. The panel consisted of Kent Feuring, president of the East Hampton Aviation Association; Barry Raebeck, co-founder of Say No To KHTO; Kathryn Slye Allen, East Hampton Aviation Association; John Kirrane of the Noyac Citizens Advisory Committee and the City of Southampton Anti-Aircraft Noise Committee, and East Hampton City Board Member Jeffrey Bragman.

On April 27, 2022, Kent Feurring himself posted these “Impressions of a Pilot” saying, “Flying is freedom in its purest form, dancing in the clouds following a storm. Rolling and sliding, rolling and spinning, feeling the joy swelling within; Leaving earth with its troubles and flying, and knowing the warmth of a clear spring sky. Then back to earth at the end of the day, freed from the tensions that have dissipated, If my end comes while I am in flight, whether it be the lightest or the darkest night: spare me your tears and ignore the pain , sure to know that I would do it again. Because each one of us is created to die, and in me I know that I was born to fly.

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